Architecture, Design and Building Science

This program's collection of continuing education courses provides the architect/student with a catalog of courses on every construction division. Courses include products and their application, safety, the environmental impact of products, and application case studies. Users can search the catalog using CSI division numbers, keywords, manufacturer names, or product descriptions.

"Suspended Wood Ceilings: Design to Delivery" from 9Wood

Program: Architecture, Design and Building Science

This course covers the benefits of suspended wood ceilings; materials including wood options such as veneers, solid wood or reclaimed wood; sustainability attributes; and performance characteristics. It features a comprehensive discussion of the key factors that inform and influence the specification of a suspended wood ceiling.

The IDCEC Opening Slide with course credit information is here.

 

See more videos from 9Wood here

A "Systems Approach" to resilient sustainability

Program: Architecture, Design and Building Science

Particular focus in this panel discussion is on energy-efficiency and water mitigation. With a major push toward energy-efficiency and reduced carbon footprints while insuring that structures remain functional, many municipalities and states—notably California and New York—are pushing to reduce and, eventually, eliminate fossil fuel as the major source of energy while insuring that buildings perform or "bounce back" after natural or man-made disasters.

Advanced Waterproofing Solutions with a PUMA System

Program: Architecture, Design and Building Science

This presentation describes overcoming waterproofing challenges by utilizing a liquid-applied PUMA system. PUMA is a cold fluid-applied waterproofing system with quick-curing technology providing longterm stability, permanent UV exposure resistance to impact, scratches, punctures and slip resistance.

PUMA technical advances allow for waterproofing certainty where sheet-applied membranes are difficult to install due to complex design and construction requirements. Through this step-by-step presentation, you will understand how PUMA may solve common installation obstacles and how to properly specificity/install a PUMA system to suit project specific needs. Enjoy an engaged discussion, find out which system is right for your project, and ask project specific questions.

Advancing Light Quality for Human Preference and Well-Being

Program: Architecture, Design and Building Science

This course offers 1.50 LU/HSW Credits.

Light sources in commercial spaces are usually driven by maximizing efficacy, often at the expense of light quality. This course will review how today’s technology allows the quality of light to be more tailored to human preference, especially when it comes to designing interior spaces using lighting. It will focus on recent studies on human preference lighting and the key metrics used to assess a luminaire’s quality of light. It will also provide an overview of TM-30-18, the latest test method released by the Illuminating Engineering Society to measure light quality.


Please download the supplemental study material after enrolling. It is intended to be part of the course and its content will be referenced in the quiz.

 

See more videos from Focal Point here

An Introduction to Custom Balanced Doors

This course is presented in HD by the president of Ellison and provides an introduction to a unique form of commercial entry door known as a balanced door. You will explore various components of a balanced door system, numerous advantages of a balanced door over conventional hinged or pivoted swing doors, how balanced doors meet ADA guidelines, and the specific design requirements needed to accommodate balanced doors.

Aspen Art Museum: Design and Construction of the Wood Roof Structure

The Aspen Art Museum, designed by architect Shiguru Ban, includes a long-span three-dimensional wood space-frame rook.
 

Ban’s charge was to create a wood space frame with spans of more than 50 feet and cantilevers of 14 feet, in a structural depth of 3 feet. The space frae was to have two planes of intersecting diagonal webs of curved meters that undulated up and down to touch the planes of the top and bottom horns with no visible connectors.
 

This case study presentation will describe the design and construction of the wood structure, including paths explored but not chosen for the final design.

See more videos from Woodworks here

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