Architecture, Design and Building Science

This program's collection of continuing education courses provides the architect/student with a catalog of courses on every construction division. Courses include products and their application, safety, the environmental impact of products, and application case studies. Users can search the catalog using CSI division numbers, keywords, manufacturer names, or product descriptions.

Transportation Alternatives for Sustainable Cities

Program: Architecture, Design and Building Science

Elevators are a critical part of urban density. However, as buildings increase in height, the elevator core grows to accommodate the number of elevators required, reducing floor area ratio in a building. Recent innovations in vertical transportation revolve around how many elevators can be in a shaft and how we can dispatch those elevators intelligently. Dual-car systems optimize the elevator core area, while offering the flexibility of independently moving cars. Multidirectional elevators take this paradigm even further, as multiple carriages can be consolidated into fewer shafts, reducing the elevator’s footprint by up to 50%. 

A World of Plastics: Designing Practical Solutions

Program: The Business of Architecture

Discarded plastic is piling up around the world and pooling in the ocean drawing increased attention from global corporations, NGOs and consumers. From campaigns & commitments to use less plastic (especially single-use and hard-to-recycle plastic) to initiatives for Building Product manufacturers to make products differently and create better recycling streams, there are many efforts underway to find new solutions that improve the lives of people and our ecosystems. Academic and manufacturing / recycler points of view will showcase the life cycle of plastic building products and explore opportunities for organizations of all sizes to be part of the solution. Presenters will explore and discuss opportunities to develop new business models, innovations & multi-stakeholder approaches.

Measuring-up Healthy Buildings: Modes, Methods, and Meaning for Discovery and Practice

Program: Architecture, Design and Building Science

This is the video recording of a course presented at Greenbuild 2018. Sustainable buildings have typically been measured in two ways: by their reduction in resource consumption and their achievement of green building certifications. However, neither of these criteria measure the most important aspect of the building – its impact on occupants’ comfort, health, well-being, and productivity. In order to accurately record and generalize this information, longitudinal, pre-and post-occupancy evaluation studies are crucial. This session will explore the methodology behind the 36-month occupant’s multi-comfort study conducted at the Saint-Gobain & CertainTeed North American Headquarters in Malvern, Pa., in partnership with the University of Oregon’s High Performance Environments Lab (HiPE). The presentation will delve into the methods and protocols that guided this research study as well as the findings related to thermal, visual, acoustical comfort, and indoor air quality as well as occupant productivity, satisfaction, health and well-being. It will also explore how Saint-Gobain was able to utilize the headquarters as a living laboratory to measure the impact of its sustainable building materials and systems on occupant’s satisfaction.

Can Your Spec Reverse Global Warming?

Program: Architecture, Design and Building Science

IDCEC Course No. CEU-109303 Your IDCEC member credits will be reported for you.

This course is a recording of a presentation from GreenBuild 2018. According to experts, carbon emissions from the built environment need to peak within the next 15 years for Earth to have a chance of staying below the global warming tipping point. Within that same time period, 900 billion square feet of new buildings/major renovations will be constructed globally. The building sector is the world’s single largest emitter of Green House Gases (GHGs), accounting for 30-40% of total global GHG emissions. Although operational emissions account for more of a building's carbon footprint over its entire life, between now and 2050, half of the carbon footprint of that 900 B ft2 will be embodied carbon. To address this, manufacturers must reduce the carbon footprint of building products. This session will equip manufacturers, architects, designers, and other building industry professionals with specific and practical strategies for selecting products and materials that reduce embodied carbon emissions and move the industry toward making carbon-storing products the rule, rather than the exception. This course presents experts in climate-friendly design, product manufacturing and specification writing who will empower students to ensure their daily work contributes to creating a climate fit for life.

Harnessing technology for more sustainable buildings: bringing mass timber and life cycle analysis to scale

Program: Architecture, Design and Building Science

Craig Curtis, FAIA, and Jim Nicolow, FAIA, LEED Fellow will outline two exciting initiatives to ramp industry production and reduce the carbon footprint of construction. First, the successful implementation of LCA systems to comprehensively track and evaluate a building’s environmental performance across the fragmented design, building products manufacturing, and construction industries. Second, pulling a Lever on Climate Change – CLT at Scale. Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is fundamentally changing the way we design, manufacture, and build.

Roof System Resiliency

Program: Architecture, Design and Building Science

This course covers the design aspects, material components, and performance issues that result in a roof system that not only weathers the storm but helps keep a building habitable. The increasing incidence of extreme weather events jeopardizes those networks whenever infrastructure damage occurs. Long-term sustainability necessitates an inherent and essential capacity for designing for resilience in the face of vulnerability and buildings that can adapt to the changing environments in which they were built.

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